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New(er) Podcasts in Emergency Medicine

Hey folks, welcome back to the  iTeachEM blog! I’ve been on a bit of a break…just moved from Maryland to the great state of Kentucky and joined the faculty at The University of Kentucky Department of Emergency Medicine. My podcast and blog contributing has not been great for the last three months due to moving. […]

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Are you Ready for Reddit?

A Guide to Reddit: The (potential) Front Page of Social Media Medical based Education Thanks to Daniel Cabrera and Scott Kobner for this brilliant post!       What is Reddit? Reddit is one of the most popular and rapidly growing social media platforms today, with Alexa ranking it as the 36th most popular website […]

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Stress Inoculation Training

One of the hottest buzzphrases in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Education is Stress Inoculation Training (SIT). For this podcast, Swami had the opportunity to sit down and chat with Michael Lauria. Mike is a 1st year medical student at Dartmouth University Medical School but he has extensive experience in SIT from his time as […]

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Getting to No

I recently sat down with Salim Rezaie, Swami, and Terry Mulligan during The Teaching Course just last month to record a new episode of iTeachEM…. We discussed the art of saying yes and no in your career. Please leave your comments here on the blog and tweet your thoughts about this very important topic.  

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How health professions educators should use social media

Michelle Lin, creator of the amazing ALIEM blog, recently spoke at the inaugural 2014 SoMeSummit in Canada as part of the International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE). This talk is a strong contender for the definitive explanation of ‘how health professions educators should use social media’. Watch it now:

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Teaching Risk Taking Behavior in Medical Education

This post was put together by the incredibly talented and brilliant, Swami.       A 44-year-old healthy man presents with dull chest pain for 3 hours. His EKG is unremarkable. What’s his risk for acute coronary syndrome? Should he get a troponin? Two troponins? Observation and a stress test? Emergency Medicine is an inherently […]